December 3, 2020

Q&A with Dora Trenbeath

When did you start your work on “The Children’s Hour?”

 

We started working on it in May, when I got the assignment. We found out about it about a week or two before school was over and we started work almost immediately.

 

What is the role of the stage manager?

 

Basically, the stage manager is the person who should know every single thing about the show, about the process. In rehearsal, I need to know where every actor stands on stage. I need to know what all the designers need. I need to know what people want and make sure that it’s happening. Someone should be able to ask me any question regarding the production aspect, and I should have an answer for it. If not, I should be able to find one out immediately.

 

As the stage manager, how did you approach “The Children’s Hour”?

 

The most important thing, especially early on in the process, is to just facilitate communication between all of the designers and director. That’s the most important thing, especially on this show slot because all of the preliminary work happens over summer, so it’s all through phone calls and emails and drop box.

 

In your own words, what is “The Children’s Hour” about? What are some of the major aspects of it?

 

I think what it comes down to is how fast a lie can spread and how fast a lie can turn into something that can ruin people’s lives. It’s such a basic human idea that lying is bad, but the show really shows the wildfire that can come of that. I think people will also take away very different ideas of what is happening and whose side you’re on and who you end up feeling for in the end.

 

Do you have a favorite scene?

 

I think it’s all wonderful, but the third act is my favorite. That’s when you see the whole thing come together. You have to see the show to understand. I think the best part of the story happens in Act 3.

 

Why should people see “The Children’s Hour”?

 

It’s a great cast. It’s a great story. In the theatrical world, it’s fairly new work. But the story is so classic.

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