November 30, 2020

Twilight fans flock to “Breaking Dawn” debut

Forty-five Webster University freshmen waited to leave West Hall at 9:30 p.m. to see the midnight showing of “Breaking Dawn: Part 1,” the most recent movie in the Twilight series. “Breaking Dawn: Part 1” premiered on Friday, Nov. 18.

The biggest debate between them was one that has continued since the beginning of the series — team Edward versus team Jacob.

“I would hear, ‘Are you team Edward? Because you can’t sit with me if you’re team Edward,’” Jay Russell, a residential assistant (RA) for 1 west in West Hall, said.

Russell, junior marketing and advertising major, always went with a big group of her friends to see the latest “Twilight” movie.  This year, Russell thought it’d be a good idea to expand the invitation to her freshman floor but then more freshmen in the dorm caught wind of the event and wanted to go too.

“Originally it was supposed to be a floor program, but then people were saying, ‘I wish I lived on your floor.  This (event) is so awesome.’  So I was like, ‘Well, I’ll see what I can do,’” Russell said.

She tried to get funding for the event to be open to all of the freshman class, but was told the niche of people who enjoy the “Twilight” movies is too small and specific to be a freshman excursion.  Then, Russell decided to make it a building program and was able to get Housing and residential life to pay for half of the total amount, which came to be about $250.

Movie tickets are $10.50 per person at Wehrenberg Ronnies 20 Cine in South County, so the students had to pay $5 out of pocket.  Even though students weren’t taken completely on Webster’s dime, they were still happy to see the movie on premier night for such a discounted price.

“I was really excited because I planned to see it anyway,” Lauren Grover, freshman secondary English education major, said.  “Then I found out it was only $5 so I thought, ‘I’m definitely going to go now.’”

Russell posted sign-up sheets on every floor for about a month.  By the time all the tickets had been sold, 45 students were signed up, paid for and ready to see the first of the last installation of vampire-werewolf drama.

The fans also wore “Breaking Dawn,” “Team Edward” and “Team Jacob” T-shirts for the showing.

“With Harry Potter, people get all dressed up.  I thought it’d be like that, but it wasn’t really,” Grover said.

Grover said the “Twilight” series has a lot to offer its readers and viewers.

“There’s action, fantasy, romance and healthy competition in choosing sides and debating them,” Russell said. “’Breaking Dawn’ was somewhat weird and more intense than any of the past movies, but it did a good job in drawing out emotion that the other movies lacked.”

Grover and Russell have read all the “Twilight” books and seen all the movies, but neither of them considers themselves “Twihards,” (diehard fans). Russell said she was anti-“Twilight” when the first movie came out in 2008, but after reading the books she became more involved.  Still, she hasn’t chosen a team.

“Both of them have personality flaws,” Russell said. “Edward is too clingy and pushy … Jacob is an extremist.  Bella is kind of winey.”

Tyler Jensen, junior music education major and RA for 2 South in West Hall, feels “Twilight” has taken away the legitimacy of vampires because of the changes the series has made to what most know about vampires.

In “Twilight,” vampires sparkle in the sun whereas vampires are typically known for burning or exploding when caught in the sunlight.  He also doesn’t see the appeal others have with the movies.

“I think it’s highly overrated… Every poster or clip I see of ‘Twilight,’ every actor is making the same confused face,” Jensen said.

Still, Jensen understands “Twilight” does attract some viewers and the event went really well for those interested.  For those uninterested in the movie, Jensen said another option should have been offered.

“As far as movies go, it does have a huge following, but it’d be cool if there was a second event that was happening at West Hall during that night for students who don’t like ‘Twilight,’” Jensen said.

 

 


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