October 24, 2017

News

GRAPHIC BY JOSHUA MAASSEN / Webster University seniors with a student visa must find a job in their area of study withing three months of graduating or must return to their countries
GRAPHIC BY: JOSH COPPENBARGER
CONTRIBUTED BY RACHEL KAUFER Lauren Flecke, a Webster alumnus, tries to avoid the overwhelming smell while diving in a dumpster outside the Webster Villiage Apartments Feb. 19 during a waste audit conducted by WSES.
JOSHUA MAASSEN / The Journal  Back up emergency lights guided students through the May Gallery inside the Sverdrup building when the power suddenly went out at the university and other areas of Webster Groves, Feb. 21. Ameren Missouri restored power on campus approximately an hour later.
KAT MEYERS / The Journal Students Gabriall Moore and Jay Robinson and Multicultural Center associate Rene Murph speak to Webster students and the community about Black History Month and the impact of black culture in contemporary American politics in the University Center presentation room on Tuesday, Feb. 22.

Global Forum explores the meaning of global citizenship

Promoting global citizenship is more than jet-setting across the country, speaking six different languages or wearing a ‘global citizenship’ badge. On Feb. 8, Webster University held a Global Citizenship Forum, allowing students in any of its campuses to log in online and give their opinion of what it means to be a global citizen.

Graphic by Josh Coppenbarger and Amanda Keefe
KAT MYERS / The Journal  Gladys Smith and Patrick Stack, Webster University life developments counselors, advise Webster Groves High School students relating to their personal experiences with drugs.
KAT MYERS / The Journal  A Webster staff member works to remove the fallen ice and snow  three days after the storm on Friday, Feb. 4.

Professors, students struggle with snow days

Webster University closed for two days due to the heavy snow and ice that fell on the area. The snow days caused the flow of some classes to be disrupted. The snow has forced teachers to cram everything they had planned into one class or cut it out all together.